Marysville American Legion Auxiliary Unit #449

Auxiliary Unit 449 Facebook Page click on linc below

 

 

 
Left to right:  Mary Davis, Nina Summerer, June Ward, Barb Hart, Helene Smith,
Gail Toles, Fran LoCicero,Vicki Jeffries, Olive Hartman

Officers

 

 

Officers

 

President – Fran LoCicero
1st Vice President – Olive Hartman
Secretary – Vicky Jeffries
Treasurer – Nina Summerer
Chaplain – Gale Toles
Historian – Kay Fournier
Sgt-at-Arms – Mary Davis

 

Excecutive Board
 
Barb Hart
June Ward
Helene Smith
 
Parliamentarian
Olive Hartman
  Past President

Kay Fournier

Auxiliary Membership Eligibility
 

Membership in the American Legion Auxiliary shall be limited to the grandmothers, mothers, sisters, wives, and direct and adopted female descendants of members of The American Legion, and to the grandmothers, mothers, sisters, wives, and direct and adopted female descendants of all men and women who were in the Armed Forces of the United States during any of the following periods and died in the line of duty during such service, or who, having received an Honorable Discharge, died after service:

A woman who is eligible for American Legion membership is eligible to join the American Legion Auxiliary regardless of whether or not she is a member of The American Legion. However, eligibility of her female relatives (sister, mother, direct decedents) depends upon her membership in The American Legion.

   

  Are you under the age of 18? You can join as a Junior member.

Membership dues for Auxiliary Unit 449 are as followes:
New Member $35.00 the first year
$30.00 each year after
$10.00 for Junior members

AUX Application

To print an application just click on AUX Application above, and being in with a copy of
a DD for 214, or Honorable Dishcharge papers of who you are joining under.

Purpose
The American Legion Auxiliary is the largest patriotic women’s service organization in the world,
with nearly 1 million members. Affiliated with The American Legion, the Auxiliary is a veterans’
service organization with members in nearly 10,000 American communities. The organization
sponsors volunteerprograms on the national and local levels, serving veterans, their families and
their communities.
Auxiliary members believe in the ideals and principles of America’s founding fathers and pledge to
foster patriotism, preserve and defend the Constitution, promote allegiance to God and Country, and
uphold the basic principles of freedom of religion, freedom of expression and freedom of choice. The
Auxiliary embodies the spirit of America that has prevailed through war and peace and continues to
stand firmly behind America today, as it did when the organization was first founded.
 
Initially, the Auxiliary was organized by concerned women who took on the day-to-day responsibilities
of life when their male family members went across sea during World War I. Aware of the many fatherless
families and the needs of returning veterans, Auxiliary women vowed to continue their supportive roles
when the veterans of World War I founded The American Legion in 1919. Auxiliary members today are
wives, mothers, sisters, daughters, granddaughters and great-granddaughters of these courageous veterans.
Some members are veterans themselves.
 
The Auxiliary has conceived and implemented hundreds of programs for veterans, their families, young
people and the community at large. Many programs have been expanded, creating commonly accepted
institutions within the community and nation.
 
Two of the American Legion Auxiliary’s showcase programs are Girls State and Girls Nation. Both are
intended for young women entering their senior year in high school with an interest in local, state and
federal government. As a result of participation in these programs, these young women take responsibility
for good citizenship and develop an understanding of government.
 
In addition to the Girls State and Girls Nation programs, the Auxiliary takes part in many community service
projects and activities, while providing a focal point for citizens’ involvement within their own communities.
The Auxiliary raises more than $18 million every year and reinvests these funds in VA medical centers and
community programs. Thousands of hours are devoted to crime prevention, instructing children, elderly and
the general public on safety and protection within the community. The Auxiliary supports programs for drug
and alcohol abuse, missing children, teen suicide and teen pregnancy while working with organizations like
the Children’s Miracle Network and Red Cross.
 
Auxiliary volunteers are the backbone of assistance in 171 VA Medical Centers. These volunteers not only
provide diversion and entertainment for patients, but assist the hospital staff in physical and psychological
therapy. There are more than 20 programs nationwide that receive support and financial aid from the
American Legion Auxiliary,and the Auxiliary is a national co-sponsor of the National Veterans Creative Arts Festival.
 
Along with The American Legion, the Auxiliary has helped to lead the movement to return to the people their
right to protect the American Flag from physical acts of desecration. The American Legion Family is working in
Washington for passage of a Constitutional amendment to help protect and preserve the fabric of the nation.
 
The services of the American Legion Auxiliary directly and indirectly touch the lives of all Americans. With the
philosophy of “Service, not Self,” the American Legion Auxiliary develops a strong spirit of volunteerism in its
members, who have joined together in the fellowship of giving to others.
 
Few people realize that:
 
    * The Auxiliary and the Legion are often centers for community and civic activities in
mid-America, and provide a focal point for citizens’ involvement.
  
  * The Auxiliary raises more than $18 million every year and reinvests those funds in
VA medical centers and community programs.
  
  * Thousands of hours are devoted to crime prevention programs, instructing children,
the elderly and the general public on safety, crime prevention and protection within the
community.

* Auxiliary volunteers are the backbone of assistance in the 171 VA Medical Centers.
 
   * They not only provide diversion and entertainment for patients, but assist the hospital
staff in physical and psychological therapy, clerical and many other duties that would
otherwise cost American taxpayers millions of dollars.
 
   * The Auxiliary deals with issues such as drug and alcohol abuse, missing and abused
children, teen suicide and teen pregnancy. Its services touch the lives of all Americans
directly or indirectly.
 
   * More than 20 nationwide programs receive support and financial aid from the 
American Legion Auxiliary.
Mission Statement
The mission of the American Legion Auxiliary is to serve veterans, their families and their communities.
Preamble 

   

For God and Country, we associate ourselves together for the following purposes:

To uphold and defend the constitution of the United States of America; to maintain law and order;
 to foster and perpetuate a one hundred percent Americanism; to preserve the memories and incidents
of our associations during the Great Wars; to inculcate a sense of individual obligation to the community,
state and nation; to combat the autocracy of both the classes and the masses; to make right the master
of might; to promote peace and goodwill on earth; to safeguard and transmit to posterity the principles
of justice, freedom, and democracy; to participate in and contribute to the accomplishment of the aims
and purposes of The American Legion; to consecrate and sanctify our association by our devotion to
mutual helpfulness. 

Explanation of the Preamble to the Constitution of the American Legion Auxiliary
 
“For God and Country, we associate ourselves together for the following purposes:
 
To uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States of America…”
 
The first of the 10 principles of The American Legion and Auxiliary is a sacred pledge of allegiance
 to the Constitution of the United States. It is most appropriate that the first ideas presented in the
Preamble be dedicated to the continued defense of our nation by those very persons who have
either served in wartime or had a close relative who served. The pledge to uphold and defend America
is the first obligation of every Legionnaire and Auxiliary member.
 
 
“To maintain law and order…”
 
Law and order must be maintained if freedom is to be maintained. Liberty is not license. Good
government means that all citizens are secure in their lives and property. To this, the Legion and
Auxiliary are pledged by the second principle stated in the Preamble.
 
 
“To foster and perpetuate a one hundred percent Americanism…”
 
The term “Americanism” covers all of the things that have made the American nation great and
the American people free. It implies qualities of character as well as principles of government.
Under this Constitution’s principles, the Legion and Auxiliary have worked, and are continuing to
work, to defeat the attempts of subversive organizations to undermine our system. We attempt
to build loyalty to and confidence in American ideals, and to develop an American citizenship
capable of making America’s free form of government a constantly greater success.
 
 
“To preserve the memories and incidents of our associations during the Great
Wars…”
 
Every member of the Auxiliary has close personal associations with the sacrifice of war, be it
World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, Grenada/Lebanon, Panama and Persian Gulf War. The
associations and incidents of these struggles are to be remembered not only for their heroes,
their victories for freedom, but also to remind us of the awful implications and inevitable tragedies
accompanying war.
 
 
“To inculcate a sense of individual obligation to the community, state and nation…”
 
The individual is the basis of the American nation. Unlike other ideas of government, the American
ideal places the individual first. The nation belongs to the individual, not the individual to the nation.
The government exists for the purpose of serving the individual, not the individual for the purpose
of serving the nation. If this ideal is to survive, there must be a voluntary sense of obligation of the
individual to the nation and its component parts, the community and state. The American citizen
serves his community, state and nation, not as a driven slave, but as a free man guided by his
own sense of duty. To inculcate this feeling among all Americans is one of the great purposes of
the Legion and Auxiliary.
 
 
“To combat the autocracy of both the classes and the masses…”
 
If America is to remain “the land of the free,” the government must always be a government of all the
people and for all the people. No classes are recognized in America. No masses of downtrodden
people exist. Neither must be permitted to develop, but America must be kept the country of opportunity
for all, where every citizen’s first allegiance is to the nation, not to some social or economic class or
mass. Dominance must not be gained by any such grouping of Americans. This is another basic pledge
of the Legion and Auxiliary.
 
 
“To make right the master of might…
 
The American form of government guarantees equal rights to all citizens. The American Legion Auxiliary,
born from a struggle against ruthless might, pledges their strength to a continued struggle to prevent
invasion of the rights of any citizen by any force, no matter of what character.
 
 
“To promote peace and goodwill on earth…”
 
The men and women of the Legion and the women of the Auxiliary know well the ghastly futility of war.
We know that war brings only misery to any nation, which engages in it, to the victor as well as the
vanquished. With the lessons of war constantly in mind, we pledge ourselves to promote peace and
goodwill among nations. We have worked steadily in the cause in the face of forces, which have sought
to sow enmity and war throughout the world.
 
 “To safeguard and transmit to posterity the principles of justice, freedom and
democracy…”
 
These were the principles that inspired America’s great war efforts over the decades, and the Legion
and Auxiliary stand determined that these principles should not be lost to America in time of peace.
Following this pledge, the Legion and Auxiliary work to safeguard justice, freedom and democracy
against the dangers of indifferent citizenship and undermining by their enemies. It strives to give
understanding of and devotion to these principles to the younger generations of Americans so that
they will endure for the future of the country.
 
 
“To participate in and contribute to the accomplishment of the aims and purposes of
The American Legion
…”
 
 Thus, the Auxiliary pledges its full strength to the support of The American Legion, and affirm its
character as an auxiliary to the Legion. It has always been faithful to this pledge, never developing
programs or policies of its own, but directing all of its activities towards the “accomplishment of the
aims and purposes of The American Legion.”
 
 
“To consecrate and sanctify our association by devotion to mutual helpfulness.”
In this final phrase of the Preamble is set forth the purpose which has guided the Legion and Auxiliary
in all of their vast rehabilitation and youth work; in everything they have done to lighten the burden for
those suffering from the results of wars; and to bring full justice to those paying the human price for
America’s victory. In this work of mercy and relief, the Auxiliary has made great contributions toward
the achievement of the Legion’s purpose.

     

                 The Poppy Story              

 
From the battlefields of World War I, weary soldiers brought home the memory of a barren landscape
transformed by wild poppies, red as the blood that had soaked the soil. By that miracle of nature, the
spirit of their lost comrades lived on.
The poppy became a symbol of the sacrifice of lives in war, and represented the hope that none had
died in vain. The American Legion Auxiliary Poppy has continued to bloom for the casualties of four wars,
its petals of paper bound together for veterans by veterans, reminding America each year that the men
and women who have served and died for their country deserve to be remembered.
Poppy Day has become a familiar tradition in almost every American community. This distribution of the
bright red memorial flower to the public is one of the oldest and most widely recognized programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
This poppy, as a memorial flower to the war dead, can be traced to a single individual, Miss Moina Michael.
She was so moved by Col. McCrae’s poem that she wrote a response:
                                                                   
                                                                                  . . . the blood of heroes never dies
                                                       but lends a luster to the red
                                                       of the flower that blooms above the dead
                                                       In Flanders Fields.
On impulse, she bought a bouquet of poppies – all that New York City’s Wanamaker’s Department Store
had – and handed them to businessmen meeting at the New York YMCA where she worked. She asked
them to wear the poppy as a tribute to the fallen. That was November 1918. World War I was over, but
America’s sons would rest forever “in Flanders Fields.” Later, she would spearhead a campaign that
would result in the adoption of the poppy as the national symbol of sacrifice.

 
                                               In Flanders Field
 
                                          In Flanders fields the poppies blow
                                          Between the crosses, row on row,
                                          That mark our place; and in the sky
                                          The larks, still bravely singing, fly
                                          Scarce heard amid the guns below.
 
                                         We are the Dead. Short days ago
                                         We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
                                          Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
                                          In Flanders fields. 
 
 
                                         Take up our quarrel with the foe:
                                         To you from failing hands we throw
                                         The torch; be yours to hold it high.
                                          If ye break faith with us who die
 
 
                                         We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
                                          In Flanders fields.
 
                                             John McCrea
 
 

 

              

             Symbolism of the Poppy

The red petals stand for the vast outpouring of blood; the yellow and black center, the mud and
desolation of all battlefields.

The green of the stem is symbolic of the forests, meadows and fields where generations of
Americans have perished to make this land free.

The stem represents the courage and determination of our fallen warriors.

The assembled product, a flower, is a symbol of resurrection, which is sure to follow.